Can You Treat Yourself to a Big, Delicious Lobster?

Dr. Oz has the answer.

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Q: Can you treat yourself to a big, delicious lobster?

Oz Says: Yes, you can!

It tastes indulgent, but this low-cal crustacean really is good for you. Lobster has heart-healthy omega-3s, plus protein and calcium. Its high dietary cholesterol used to get doctors worried, but new science holds that cholesterol in food doesn't affect blood cholesterol the way we once thought.

Where folks tend to go wrong: drowning lobster in butter and mayo, stuffing it with bread crumbs, injecting it into ravioli… you get the picture. This shellfish doesn't need any gussying up — it's born decadent, people. Get it steamed, grilled, boiled, broiled, or poached (in water, not butter; restaurants can be sneaky).

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Stick to a tablespoon of added fat per serving — a thumb-size dollop of mayo or a large spoonful of buttery sauce — or dunk it into one of the healthy swaps below.

Alterna-Dips: Your Lob's Gonna Love These

  • Lemon juice + olive oil + chopped chives + pepper
  • Plain yogurt + chopped cilantro + lime juice + red pepper flakes
  • Soy sauce + rice vinegar + fresh ginger + minced garlic

But wait — what about the green stuff?

Skip it. That's the lobster's liver-pancreas combo, fancily known as the tomalley. It's like a filter for contaminants from the sea, and it tends to trap the yucky gunk. But the reddish bits in the tail? Those are just eggs — like lobster caviar. Go for it.

This story originally appeared in the July/August 2016 issue of Dr. Oz The Good Life.

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