Why Lena Dunham Turned to Tracy Anderson for Help Managing Her Endometriosis

'I have chronic physical pain, I just want to feel stronger... I want to feel like I have more power throughout my day.'

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Lena Dunham is one of the most outspoken and authentic role models of this decade, and the writer/director/actress/feminist just dropped another truthbomb on why working out is about way more than what you look like in a bikini.

Check out the full Instagram message she posted late last week:

I feel I've made it pretty clear over the years that I don't give even the tiniest of shits what anyone else feels about my body. I've gone on red carpets in couture as a size 14. I've done sex scenes days after surgery, mottled with scars. I've accepted that my body is an ever changing organism, not a fixed entity- what goes up must come down and vice versa. I smile just as wide no matter my current size because I'm proud of what this body has seen and done and represented. Chronic illness sufferer. Body-shaming vigilante. Sexual assault survivor. Raging hottie. Just like all of YOU. Right now I'm struggling to control my endometriosis through a healthy diet and exercise. So my weight loss isn't a triumph and it also isn't some sign I've finally given in to the voices of trolls. Because my body belongs to ME--at every phase, in every iteration, and whatever I'm doing with it, I'm not handing in my feminist card to anyone. Thank you to @tracyandersonmethod for teaching me that exercise has the power to counteract my pain and anxiety, and to @jennikonner for being my partner in FUCK IT. I refuse to celebrate these bullshit before-and-after pictures. Don't we have infinitely more pressing news to attend to? So much love to all my web friends who demand that life be more than a daily weigh in, who know their merit has nothing to do with their size, who fight to be seen and heard and accepted. I love you- Lena

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Dunham has previously shared just how challenging her struggle with endometriosis can be, including forcing her to take time off from promoting the new season of "Girls" and literally rest up. So it makes sense that she's turned to exercise not to drop weight but to help her actually feel better.

Dunham recently shared with People that she was pleased that workouts with celebrity trainer Tracy Anderson didn't focus on how she could "shrink six inches" but rather how she can feel strong and powerful despite her diagnosis. Most importantly, perhaps, Anderson's sweat sessions have helped her get through the day with energy.

"I think for me the big thing was that Tracy just very clearly wasn't trying to change my body," Dunham told People. "I came to her and was like, 'I have endometriosis, I have chronic physical pain, I just want to feel stronger. I just want to have a stronger core. I want to feel like I have more power throughout my day, how do I get there?'"

How does she keep this attitude going strong? Dunham says during Anderson's classes, she keeps her positive mindset by dropping comparisons to others who may seem stronger or better.

"I'm so naturally unathletic that I just go in and I'm thrilled if I can achieve anything," Dunham said. "I just combat that feeling by having literally no physical expectations for myself, which makes it all work out perfectly."

Despite being a highly in-demand fitness trainer, Anderson reveals that she only wants to work with clients who are proud of themselves and their bodies as-is, who want to work out to be "healthy and balanced," not to improve comparisons to anybody else.

"Women always think that they need to look like someone else," Anderson told People. "One reason why I don't give my time to a lot of celebrities who want it is because the journey for them to want to be themselves is really distanced."

We couldn't agree more — working out should be about feeling healthier and more confident, not "less flawed" or "more beautiful." Thanks for the reminder, Lena and Tracy!

[h/t People]

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